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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
specialulativees, very upbeat, positive energy. the markets are hitting new highs in a long time, dow, s & p, nasdaq, as we're reporting up 4%, 5%. so it's a nice start but we have to see what's going to happen the next couple of weeks with earnings coming out, but so far, so good for 2013. >> tom: absolutely, very early on the january barometer looks to be very poozative for folks. how goes january gets the rest of the year is how the barometer holds. stocks failed to get much of a push from the jobs report but prices continued trending higher. the s&p 500 stumbled right out of the gate today but found its footing mid-morning. prices marked time before taking another step higher in the last ur of trading, finishing up a half percent. but the gain was enough to have the index close at a post- recession high, this is a five year high for the s&p 500. trading volume eased a bit from yesterday's pace on the big board, 650 million shares. it remained steady at 1.7 billion on the nasdaq. nine of the ten major stock sectors registered gains. the financial, materials and energy sectors led the way,
is technology, a little bit in financial, materials and energy. >> tom: growth and optimism there from u.s. trust. it's chris hizy with us from new york. >> tom: in just a few weeks the debate over government spending cuts will heat up. the defense industry is one of those targeted, and today president obama nominated former rebublican senator chuck hagel as his next secretary of defense. hagel is a decorated vietnam veteran and former businessman. the president called him, "the leader our troops deserve." >> as a successful businessman he also knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy, and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. >> tom: hagel's not a shoe-in for the position. he's received criticism for his record on israel, iran, and gay rights. current defense secretary leon panetta says he will retire when his replacement is approved by the senate. >> tom: tonight we begin a new weekly series here on nbr. we partnered with some of the nation's top universities to bring you the best research on bus
. all 10 of the major stock sectors were stronger. the financial sector led the gains, up 1.4%. energy was up 1%. and the telecommunications sector gained 0.8%. after the closing bell, the focus remains on finance. american express reased its fourth quarter earnings, announcing them a week earlier than expected. earnings came in three cents per share better than expected. but the firm will cut 5,400 jobs, reducing its employee count by 8.5%. american express shares were up 0.9% ending the regular session just below a new 52 week high. and the stock continued rallying in extended hours trading, up another 1%. if that holds through tomorrow's opening bell, it would be a new 12 month high. other financial stocks moving today included morgan stanley, up 3.7%. it announced its own round of layoffs yesterday. asset manager legg mason gaining 3.2%. and bank of america was up 3.1%. it led the gainers for the dow. energy stocks were higher as oil prices continue to heat up. oil settled at $93.82 per barrel, this is a five month high. cell phone market nokia's fourth quarter earnings will be str
, continuing our transformation and energy, grabbing the energy sources of the future and dominating them and developing energy independence. but these things are going to require the appropriate priorities and those are reflected in budgets. if all we do is rachet down, you know, essentiay cle the government down for all intents and purposes so that we're not attending to these things, we're going to have a much less good future so how that debate comes out is important. but there are other issues, immigration reform this very important gun dekbats we're having. the, you know, how we effectuate the transition in health care to the health-care reform. there are a lot of issues on which you know, we have to get it right. and he is going to provide the leadership that we need to get it right i believe. >> here's one issue. theodore roosevelt talked about the bully pulpit where it was used. we saw another issue of bill clinton at the convention with the ca passit ot explain and the president began to call him the explain never chief. are there limitations on this president's ability to move
think it has less to do with over population but are we using our energy resources smartly. are we actually educating folks. because you can argue that china as they increase middle class, they actually all of a sudn want to be high priced middle class as very simple level, something that -- meat prices are going up that is a luxury. how are we educating our population that we're being kind to the environment and using stuff at our disposal working smartly. >> it does respond -- i think something very natural about this. people are going to have to deal with children when they feel more uniform courtable about the environment and -- >> the economy. >> and certainly about the economy. i think this is goingo take care of itself. women have lot of children when they -- >> we got to run. that's it for this education of "to the contrary." please follow me on twitter @bonnie erbe and @tothecontrary and check our website, pbs.org/ttc where the discussion continues. whether you agree or think, to the contrary, please join us next time. >> funding for "to the contrary" provided by: the corn
moved forward on education reform. penn yetta, the new president is a big proponent of energy reform. mexico has a lot of potential it is not tapping at present. >> tom: we mentioned the price performance that the exchange rate had, outperformed the united states, and you think it can still continue to build on those gains. >> i think the u.s. needs to be there for mexico to outperform. as long as the u.s. economy keeps growing, mexico should keep growing. >> tom: so it is really the united states helping to pull mexico up? >> and mexican labor costs, when you adjust for productivity have been held flat over the next decade. china has seen its labor costs escalate, and the two have pretty close to met. so mexico is much more competitive on a cost basis, and it is here. >> tom: just across the border. finally, that brings us to the united states. how does the u.s. look compared to the rest of the world? >> i think we are still looking okay if we can get past this budget. >> tom: you're less excited about america than you are about non-japan asia. >> i'm really excited about non-japan
doing relatively well, and we have a massive energy boom we're just in the beginnings of. but wasngton politics are toxic and getti worse. the debt limit and the frustration will be harder to deal with than the fiscal cliff. as a consequence, the politics in the united states will create some downside. we're not talking about a recession, but numbers in the u.s. could be even better if it weren't for washington looking so dysfunctional. >> tom: that drag of dysfunction in politics. ian bremmer along with us. thank you. >> susie: a big management change at sears: c.e.o. lou d'ambrosio is stepping down in february after less than two years on the job. replacing him: the company's chairman, hedge fund manager eddie lampert. as ruben ramirez reports, lampert's porities may take sears in a diffent dection. >> reporter: the revolving door in the c-suite at sears continues. sears chairman eddie lampert will be the new c.e.o. of the company his hedge fund took over in 2005. appel associates president michael appel says whoever ends up running the company will need to have retail in their blood
months on not just the budget which is obviously biggest thing but on crime, on immigration, on energy. and it's hard to see how he comes out of this process with better relations with republicans on capitol hill after this process. so, again, whatever the merits, whatever the political imperative of being seen not backing down, i think this is in the history of the next couple months is not going to be something that works in his favor. >> rose: he me understand what it is about what he has said about has created think opposition to him? >> well, i think mark got at one of the elements here which is that while it is about israel and iran, as you say, charlie, it's also about iraq. i mean, you have to remember that chuck hagel bailed out on the bush administration and on the republicans on the iraq war far earlier than almost anybody else in the republican party, at least in the senate at that time. and there were a lot of bruised feelings in that time. and people can't say that now because no one wants to step out and defend a war that today looks like a lot worse judgment than it may
million people, an oil exporter subsidizing energy-hungry poor countries, like cuba and haiti. and it sends 800,000 barrels of oil a day to the u.s.-- its number one customer. president hugo chavez has led the nation for 14 years. his third term expires today. he won re-election in october d was supposed to be sworn in again today for another six years, as the constitution requires. but chavez suffers from aggressive, reoccurring cancer, hasn't been seen in public in a month and was too sick to return to venezuela from medical treatment in cuba. >> the illness of the president has been treated like a state secret from the beginning. he has been treated in cuba under a veil of secrecy. >> reporter: moises naim is a former venezuelan cabinet minister, now a columnist and a visiting scholar at the carnegie endowment for international peace in washington. he says keeping chavez alive in havana strengthens the president's number two, nicolas maduro. >> and this is essentially a power play. behind that secrecy there is nothing but an attempt to ensure the continuity of the regime re
together so many years ago that, and for zest and adrenaline and energy. we had the years that we had together. and then so many years later these people sort of sum it all up and say, okay, we remember them which is magnificent, really. >> when did the critics take notice? >> well, they didn't like us at all. >> no. >> i don't think they understood what we were doing. >> what didn't they understand? >> i think they were revealing albums, relative to bands that had singles out as well. and said that they would make that identifiable, if you like. each single will be identifiable to the sound of a band, the character of it. we didn't do that. so when we were pushing and pushing, trying to get right over the horizon. so i think they would have trouble because they wouldn't have a point of reference that they could take from either the first album or the second album. and certainly by the time they tried to review the third album in a very short time i might adds well because they were up against a deadline. >> and also there is a ref recommendation thing in what kids play in blues, you
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)